Part 806gp – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1867 Marriage Registration – GGGG-Grandparents Thimothée and Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé – Transcription, Second Attempt

27 November 2012

Good Day,

And the genealogy work continues... even though the grey clouds of my dilated eyes are somewhat restrictive.

If I had to pick that which is one of the most difficult parts of my work, I would have to choose the transcribing of a document. It is the attempt to read and record a document word for word, as intended to be written by the author, albeit scribe. This usually means it is my challenge to read script(s).

If the document is in a foreign language, a good grasp of the language can be helpful but it is not necessary. I only state this due to the fact that technology, available via the Internet and computer software can help with the ultimate translation of the text to my mother tongue, English. If a document is typed and handwritten, in most cases printed, there is the capability of immediate transcription and further there are new tools that can electronically convert scanned images via means of Optical Character Recognition or OCR.

There are developments in the area of Handwriting Recognition or HWR. “Handwriting recognition principally entails optical character recognition. However, a complete handwriting recognition system also handles formatting, performs correct segmentation into characters and finds the most plausible words.” (Per Wikipedia) But this is still in development and, my guess is that the technology has some ways to go, to provide a quick result. And so I do the transcription work myself, without the benefits and expense of the technology.

After I have scanned and captured an image of a document or that part of the document that is specific to my genealogy work, my rule of thumb is first to try to copy word-for-word that which composes the text of the document without trying, initially to translate and understand the context of the composition. At times this is relatively easy if the author has had a good penmanship and the image copy is a good scan. At other times attempting to transcribe the script is somewhat of a chore. This can be due to a number of factors, especially, when and of what I would consider poor use of writing skills.

At this point is where I use other documents that may have been written by the same scribe. In a Register, such as a Parish Register, usually the same scribe or writer may enter the registrations to the Register over a certain period of time. By reviewing previous and later work by the same writer, at times, helps me to understand the nuances and idiosyncrasies of his writing. Also in Registers, similar type of entries, at most times, appear to have the same construction of words and phrases. Obviously there may have been a certain format of entering the information that the scribe was required to follow.

A real problem occurs when the ink used in the writing begins to fade. Also a consistent problem is the aging of the source document, that is, in what condition has it survived over the years.

In my attempt to transcribe the 20 August 1867 Marriage of gggg-grandparents Thimothée and Catherine Grenier there are a number of words, in the original French that I cannot make out due to the scribe’s writing, some penmanship corrections, and some fading of ink. Following the images, from The Drouin Collection, is my effort, my second transcription.





1865
PASPEBIAC
Paroisse
Notre-Dame
Co Bonaventure
P.Q.

Registres
Photographies
Au
Greffe
De
New Carlisle

M. 14
Thimothée Parisé
&
Catherine Grenier

Le vingt Août mil huit
cent soixante sept, les publications de
trois bans de Mariage faite au prône de notre
Messe Paroissiales, entre Timothée Parisé ,veuf
Majeur de défunte Julienne Chapados de la paroisse,
de St. George, de Port Daniel, d'une part, & Catherine
Grenier, veuve majeur de défunte, Romain Huard
du cette paroisse, d'autre part, & aucun _____
ne d'était présenté et ______ les dispenses du trois au
troisième, de quatre, au quatrième de consanguinité
& celle du trois au quatrième d'app_____ accordé par
Le Réverend Messieur Nicolas Audet Vicar Général
de la Diocèse, nous prêtre sousigné avons reçu
leur mutuel consentement de Mariage dans prés-
ence de Prudent Grenier Aime de l'épouse et Moyer
Grenier, frère de l'épouse les quels _____ _____, les épouses
ont déclaré ne savoir signer.

Chs. G. Fourniere ______


The good thing about that which I have been able to transcribe of the original French allows me to understand that both gggg-grandfather Thimothée and gggg-grandmother Catherine were widowed from their previous marriages. This Registration also provides the names of their previous and deceased spouses. This is key information as usually the registration of an initial marriage will, at times; include the names of the groom’s and bride’s parents. All I have to do is search for their original marriages.

1865
PASPEBIAC
Parish
Notre Dame
Co Bonaventure
P.Q.

Records
Photographs
In
Registry

New Carlisle
M. 14
Timothy Parisé
&
Catherine Grenier

The 20 August one thousand eight
hundred and sixty seven, publications
three banns of marriage made to our advocates
Parochial church, between Timothy Parisé, major widower
Julienne Chapados late of the parish,
St. George of Port Daniel, on the one hand, and Catherine
Grenier, major widow of the late Romain Huard
of this parish, on the other hand, and no _____
was not presented to ______ and exemptions from three to
third, four in the fourth inbreeding
& One of the three fourth app_____ granted by
The Reverend Vicar General Messieur Nicolas Audet
of the Diocese, we the undersigned priest have received
their mutual consent of marriage in the pres-
ence of Prudent Grenier, _____ wife and Moyer
Grenier, the brother of the wife which __________, the spouses
said they did not sign.

Chs. G. Fournière ______


In Part 802cp I have presented the 14 August 1865 Marriage Registration of gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé and of his first wife, Julienne Chapdos. My quest is now to discover gggg-grandmother Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé’s first marriage to Romain Huard.

At times I feel like Don Quixote... but I do take care of my eyes. I need to transcribe and translate.

Enjoy,

Jim Click here to continue reading...

Part 805p – Smith Groh Genealogy – Updated Parisé Descendant Chart

26 November 2012

Good Day,

This morning I am catching up with my genealogy entries to my Clooz 3 database. Having walked and settled down The Pack I now have to turn myself to organizing where I have been and my next steps to the genealogy of the Parisé Family Line.

A review of the current addition to the Parisé Family Descendant Chart is now necessary. The 1867 Marriage Registration of CK’s gggg-grandparents Timothée and Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé is in place. I am still working on the transcription and translation. (See Part 800gp.)


The enigmatic puzzle of gggg-grandfather Timothée’s 1865 Marriage to his first wife, Julienne Chapados, and her youthful passing has been solved. Also the untimely decease of his first infant son, ggg-granduncle Louis Ligroi Parisé is now presented. And from gggg-grandfather Timothée’s two Marriage Registrations, respectively 1865 and 1867, I have been able to determine gggg-grandfather’s parents 5-times great-grandparents Michel Barthelemy and Marie Therèse (née Duguay) Parisé.

Please Note: All information on this Descendant Chart is based on current and available information. It may change as new and more correct data is discovered.

Key - The added letters and numbers to the next to a name in the Descendant Chart, for example, C-P85p, can be used to locate an image of some of the documents as they appears in A Genealogy Hunt; http://agenealogyhunt.blogspot.com/ ; B = Birth; C = Baptism/Christening; M = Marriage; D = Death or Burial; W = Will; I = Item of Interest; 85p = Part 85p. The small letter “p” represents a surname; in this example p = Parisé.

New and updated data may be entered in red. A red or blue and yellow symbol represents the actual blood line. The symbols for collateral relationships, that is, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, etc. are not filled with color.

If you have any ideas, questions, comments, and thoughts please feel free to contact me.

And now I continue… Enjoy,

Jim

@ 2009-2012, Jim Smith
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Part 804p – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1866 Baptism and Death – Louis Ligroi Parisé – Port Daniel, Bonaventure, Québec, Canada

25 November 2012

Good Day,

And sometimes I become quite bored with my writing and researching and searching of genealogy. At times I not sure if I am really accomplishing anything… But then again at other times I know that I am, all-things-being-equal, on the right trail to discover the misplaced secrets of ancestors. And today is one of those days that I do not feel like writing. But I know I've got to keep jotting down the results of my search and research.

According to Natalie Goldberg, in her book “Writing Down the Bones” she writes “What does matter is that whatever amount of time you choose, (to write), for that session, you must commit yourself to it and for that full period:

1. Keep your hand moving. (In my case my fingers on the keyboard.)

2. Don’t cross out.

3. Don’t worry about spelling, punctuation, grammar.

4. Lose control.

5. Don’t think. Don’t get logical.

6. Go for the jugular.


Obviously these rules are not applicable to the final writing but they do certainly help when I commit myself and start to write.

Well here I go with the next installment of my search and research of the Parisé Family Line. My question in my previous post, Part 803p, was “Did gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé and his first wife Julienne (née Chapados) have a child during their short time of marriage?” And the answer is yes. They did have a son, Louis Ligroi Parisé, who was born 29 June 1866. Louis Ligroi Parisé would have been CK’s half-ggg-granduncle.

I also discovered that Louis Ligroi Parisé passed way, in Port Daniel, Quebec, shortly after his birth on 15 August 1866. He would have been a month-and-a-half old.

Here, from The Drouin Collection, the Baptism Registration of St. Georges Parish.




1855
A
1890

Port-Daniel
Cte Bonaventure
Qué

Paroisse
St Georges

Régistres
Photographies
a la
Paroisse

Soixante dix huitieme feuille

B. 38
Ls. Ligroi
Parisé
P.D.

Le sept Juillet mil huit cent soixante six
nous prêtre soussigné; avons baptisé Louis
Ligroi, né le vingt-neuf Juin dernier
du légitime mariage de Thimothée Pa-
risé, pêcheur et cultivateur; et de Julienne
Chapados, de cette paroisse. Parrain:
Ambroise Parisé; marraine: Elizabeth
Chapados qui n'ont su signer non _____ le père.

N. Lévesque _____


My attempted translation –

1855
to
1890

Port-Daniel
Bonaventure County
Quebec

Parish
St Georges

Registers
photographed
of the
Parish

Seventy eighth leaf

B. 38
Ls. Ligroi
Parisé
P.D.

On 7 July one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six
we the undersigned priest, have baptized Louis
Ligroi, born June 29 last of
the legitimate marriage of Timothy Pa-
izé, fisherman and farmer, and Julienne
Chapados, of this parish. Godfather:
Ambrose Parisé; Godmother Elizabeth
Chapados who failed to sign non _____ father.

N. Lévesque _____


And from The Drouin Collection, the Burial Registration of St. Georges Parish.




1855
A
1890

Port Daniel
Cte Bonaventure
Qué

Paroisse
St. Georges

Régistres
Photographies
a la
Paroisse

S.13
Ls. Ligroi
Parisé
P.D.

Le seize Août mil huit cent soixante-six,
nous prêtre soussigné, avons inhumé dans
Le cimetière de cette paroisse, Le corps de
Louis Ligroi, fils de Thimothée Parisé, et de
défunte Julienne Chapados décédé l'avant-veille
en cette paroisse, à l'âge de un mois et demi.
Présents: Moise Chapados, et Isaac Parisé
qui n'ont de signer.

N. Lévesque


My attempted translation -

1855
to
1890

Port Daniel
County Bonaventure
Quebec

parish
St. Georges

Registers
photographed
of the
parish

S.13
Ls. Ligroi
Parisé
P.D.

The 16 August one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six
we the undersigned priest, have buried in
this Parish Cemetery, the body
Ligroi Louis, son of Timothy Parisé and
Julienne Chapados died late the night before
in this parish, at the age of one month and a half.
Present: Chapados Moses, and Isaac Parisé
who have signed.


N. Lévesque


A sad occasion and succession of events, gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé lost his young wife, Julienne (née Chapados) after not even one year of marriage. Subsequently one month later his only and very young son Louis Ligroi passes away. Two heartbreaks, one right after another, when gggg-grandfather Timothée was just about 27 years old.

A year later, on 20 August 1867 gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé marries gggg-grandmother Catherine (née Grenier). See Part 800gp.

Stay tuned for what comes next.

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 803p – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1866 Death – Julienne (née Chapados) Parisé – Port Daniel, Bonaventure, Québec, Canada

22 November 2012

Good Day,

Two nights ago supper was Korean… a twisted version of Mandoo Guk, a Korean Dumpling Soup…pork and corn dumplings in a chicken soya broth, bean sprouts, bird chilies and a squeeze of Sriracha. We couldn’t get enough. Secret to frozen dumplings in broth, and a fresh soup, in order that they don’t get too, too mushy… bring broth to boil, drop in dumplings, and then immediately turn to simmer. Once dumplings are done and floating on top, add bean sprouts and other fresh ingredients. Couple minutes more, then serve. It was great… quick and easy. I wonder if I will ever get bored of cooking.

At this exact moment I have three of The Pack in/on the chair with me as I type my entry to A Genealogy Hunt. One, in my lap, and two curled up behind me. The two others are on the floor. It becomes a challenge of canine balancing while I attempt to type my thoughts.

My genealogy research and search goal this time was to determine the reason that and why CK’s gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé married twice successively in 1865 to Julienne Chapados and in 1867 to gggg-grandmother Catherine Grénier.

There are multiple and variety of reasons that could incite two immediate and successive marriages. One of the prime issues for a second marriage that I have discovered in the course of the time, that I have been researching genealogy, is that a wife may pass leaving her widower with an infant and/or a number very young children.

Julienne (née Chapados) Parisé died on the 5th of July 1866 in the Parish of St. Georges. A note of discovery is that her Death Registration, S.11, was entered under her maiden name, Chapados. She was buried in the Parish cemetery 7 July 1866.

From The Drouin Collection and via Ancestry.ca I have discovered the 1866 Death Registration. I have downloaded the images.




My attempt at transcribing –

S. 11
Julienne
Chapados
P.D.

Le sept Juillet, mil huit cent soixante six,
nous prètre soussigné, avons inhumé dans
Le cimetière de cette paroisse, le corps de
Julienne Chapados, épouse de Thimothée
Parisé, décédée l'avant veille, en cette
paroisse, à l'âge de vingt cinq ans.
Présents: Paul Chapados, et Edouard
Parisé qui n'ont su signer.

N. Lévesque _____


My translation –

S. 11
Julienne
Chapados
P.D.

On 7 July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty six,
we the undersigned priest, have buried in
the cemetery of this parish, the body of
Julienne Chapados, wife of Timothy
Parisé, who died two days before, in this
parish, at the age of twenty-five years.
Present: Paul Chapados, and Edward
Parisé, who failed to sign.

N. Lévesque _____


Did gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé and his first wife Julienne (née Chapados) have a child during their short time of marriage? (See Part 802cp.)

Check out my upcoming Posts to find out.

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 802cp – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1865 Marriage Registration – GGGG-Grandfather Timothée Parisé and Julienne Chapados

18 November 2012

Good Day,

And yes I did make supper again last night, as some of you have asked… Green Gumbo. I followed and adapted a recipe from one of my favorite sites, Elise Bauer’s Simply Recipes.

Turnip greens, fresh spinach, Andouille sausage, ham, celery, green pepper, onion, and spices. A chocolate roux made of peanut oil and flour was the start. And man was the Gumbo good…and filling. Dessert, pumpkin pie and whipped cream. Not bad for a Saturday night. And Simply Recipes always has some good write-ups and recipes.

In my search and research of the genealogy of a family line, it is a wonder what a fresh mind, mine that is, can make out once I put a document down for a bit and then return to it. And the job is the transcription of the 1865 Marriage Registration of CK’s gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé and his first wife Julienne Chapados.

From The Drouin Collection from the Port Daniel, Bonaventure Register here is the following image as downloaded via Ancestry.ca.





Here is my transcription.

1855
A
1890

Port-Daniel
Cte Bonaventure
Qué

Paroisse
St. Georges

M 3.

Timothée Parisé
&
Julienne Chapados.
P.D.

Le quatorze Août mil huit-cent soi-
xante cinq Après le publication de trois bans
de Mariage & acte au prône de nos na pas
paroiſseiales entre Timothée Parisé fils majeur
de Michel Parisé cultivateur & pêcheur et de Marie
Therèse Duguay de cette paroi∫se d'une part &
Julienne Chapados fille majeure de Paul Cha-
pados cultivateur & pêcheur et de Julienne Duguay
auſsi de cette paroiſse d'autre part; aucun
empêchement ne l'étant prèsenté et du la dis-
pense du trois au troisième & du quatre au
quatrième degré de consanguinité qui la
trousait entre est accordée par le Révérend
Meſsieur Ahais Meilloure Vicaire Général

Soixante huitieme feuillet

de ce Diocèse, nous prêtre soussigné Curé de Pa∫spébiac
avons nous leur mutuel consentement de Mariage et
leur avons donné la Bénédiction nuptiale soi pré-
sence de Michel Parisé père & Ambroise Parisé frère de
l'épouse & Paul Chapados père & Jean Moi∫se Chapados
frère de l'épouse les quels ainsi que les épouse n'ont
pas signer.

Ch. G. Fournier


And my translation -

1855
A
1890

Port-Daniel
County Bonaventure
Qué

Parish
St. Georges

M 3.

Timothy Parise
&
Julienne Chapados.
P.D.

On the 14th of August one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, after the publication of three banns of marriage, and advocating the act of our parish masses between Timothy Parisé, adult son of Michel Parisé farmer & fisherman, and of Marie Therèse Duguay of this parish, on the one hand, and Julienne Chapados, eldest daughter of Paul Chapados, farmer & fisherman, and of Julienne Duguay also of this parish on the other hand, no there being no impediment present and exemption from three to four in the third & fourth degree of consanguinity which was between the two, is given by the Reverend Messieur

Sixty-eighth sheet

Ahais Meilloure, Vicar General of the Diocese, we the undersigned priest Cure of Papsébiac, we have their mutual consent of marriage and have given them the nuptial blessing, in the presence of Michel Parisé father & Ambrose Parisé brother of the groom, & wife Paul Chapados father of and Jean Moise Chapados brother of the bride, as well as that the bridal couple did not sign.

G. Ch Fournier


I believe that within the text of the Marriage Registration there are the elements of acknowledgement of blood relationship between gggg-grandfather Timothée Parisé and his first wife Julienne Chapados. I am not a Roman Catholic scholar by any means, let alone my French transcription and translation could be off-the-mark somewhat.

From Wikipedia -

Roman civil law prohibited marriages within four degrees of consanguinity.[2] This was calculated by counting up from one prospective partner to the common ancestor, then down to the other prospective partner.[3] The first prohibited degree of consanguinity was a parent-child relationship while a second degree would be a sibling relationship. A third degree would be an uncle/aunt with a niece/nephew while fourth degree was between first cousins.[3] Any prospective marriage partner with a blood relationship outside these prohibited degrees was considered acceptable.[3] Canon law followed civil law until the early ninth century when the Western Church increased the number of prohibited degrees from four to seven.[4] The method of calculation was also changed to simply count the number of generations back to the common ancestor.[5] This meant that marriage to anyone up to and including a sixth cousin was prohibited. The Fourth Lateran Council of 1215 decreed a change from seven prohibited degrees back to four (but retaining the same method of calculating; counting back to the common ancestor).[6]


Does the Marriage Registration mean that in some way gggg-grandfather Timothée was somehow related to Julienne Chapados? Could be… but the one definite coincidence that is written in the 1865 Marriage Registration is that gggg-grandfather Timothée’s mother is 5-times great-grandmother Marie Therèse Duguay and Julienne Chapados’ mother is Julienne Duguay. Apart from the same last name, Duguay, could there be an immediate relationship be 5-times great-grandmother Marie Therèse and Julienne?

Any thoughts?

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 801p – Smith Groh Genealogy – Parisé Descendant Chart Update

16 November 2012

Good Day,

The work on the genealogy of the Parisé Family Line continues. I have been trying to dig deeper back into the ancestry of the family in the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec in Canada. It appears that I may have been able to discover documents and data that traces the lineage back another 100 years to about the 1730s. It is amazing what can be revealed once a brick wall is broken down just exactly what key family evidence may turn up.

The big issue of course, is the transcription and the translation of all the French documents. The translation is not the difficult part as I can read and speak French… and there are tools such as Google Translate. The part of the exercise that can be somewhat tedious and frustrating is the actual reading and transcription of the registered script and penmanship.

Here is the new updated Parisé Descendant Chart.


I have updated the Parisé Descendant Chart to include most recent and relevant Post Part numbers. The added letters and numbers to the right of a name in the Descendant Chart, for example, C-P85p, can be used to locate an image of some of the documents as they appears in A Genealogy Hunt; B = Birth; C = Baptism/Christening; M = Marriage; D = Death or Burial; W = Will; I = Item of Interest; 85p = Part 85p. The small letter “p” represents a surname; in this example b = Parisé. New and updated data may be entered in red. A red or blue and yellow symbol represents the actual blood line.

I am currently working on the transcription and translation of gggg-grandfather Thimothée Parisé’s two marriages registrations. The 1867 one to gggg-grandmother Catherine Grenier and his first one, in 1865, to Julienne Chapados. Any assistance in the transcription would be appreciated.

If you have any comment, question, though, and idea please feel free to contact me.

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 800gp – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1867 Marriage Registration – GGGG-Grandparents Thimothé and Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé – Transcription, First Attempt

14 November 2012

Good Day,

The genealogy search and research into the ancestry of Parisé Family Line continues... and I need your eyes.

From The Drouin Collection I have discovered a 20 August 1867 Marriage Registration for gggg-grandparents Thimothé and Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé. I am currently working on the transcription and translation of the actual Registration from French to English.

The most difficult part of this work is the actual transcribing of the writer’s entry of the Marriage Registration. Once the transcription is complete I can then translate the actual document. Any assistance in reviewing and working on the entry certainly would be appreciated. You can forward me your attempt directly to my email address.

One definite thing that I have been able to assess from the actual Registration is that gggg-grandfather Thimothé (aka Timothy) Parisé and gggg-grandmother Catherine Grenier both were a widower and widow, respectively, at the time of their marriage. The name of gggg-grandfather Thimothé’s first wife was Julienne Chapados. The name of gggg-grandmother Catherine’s previous was Romain Huard. From my research all four surnames; Parisé, Grenier, Chapados, and Huard were very common to the Port Daniel, Quebec area.

Here is a copy of my downloaded image.


And my attempted first transcription. I have left blanks at those points where I am having difficulty in deciphering the script.

M. 14

Thimothée Parisé
&
Catherine Grenier

Le vingt Août mil huit
cent soixante sept après les publications de
trois bans de Mariages faite aux prône de notre
Mass Paroissiale entre Timothée Parisé veuf
Majeur de defunte Julienne Chapados de la paroise
de St. Georges de Port Daniel d'une part & Catherine
Grenier veuve Majeure de défunt Romain Huard
due cette paroisse d'autre part & aucun _____
ne d'était présente et _____ les dispenses du trois _____
troisième du quatrième du _____
& celle _____ trois _____ _____ accordias Par
Le Réocrende Mejor Nicolas Audet Vicaire Général
du la Diocèse Nous prêtons _____ soussigné avons recue
leur Mutuel Consentement de Mariage _____ _____
____ de Prudent Grenier _____ de l'épouse et _____
Grenier frère de l'épouse les quels _____ led épouses
ont declare _____ savoir _____

_____ G. Fournier _____


The work continues.

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 799p – Smith Groh Genealogy – New Parisé Descendant Chart

13 November 2012

Good Day,

With the most recent discoveries and corresponding documented proofs of the genealogy of the Parisé, aka Pariza, Family I figured it was time to now create a separate Family Descendant Chart.


I use GenoPro as I find that the software allows me the freedom to easily move items around in the drafting and constructing of a chart. It is almost like working with a pencil and piece of paper versus the fixed restrictions and possible limitations of a pre-set genealogy software.

If you have any comments, questions, thoughts, and idea please feel free to contact me.

Enjoy,
Jim
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Part 798p – Smith Groh Genealogy – GGG-Grandfather Leo Pariza – Or Should I Say? – GGG-Grandfather Pierre Léandre Parisé

12 November 2012

Good Day,

21 documents on file! It took 21 documents to determine the actual origin of ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza aka ggg-grandfather Pierre Léandre Parisé.

When I assist others with researching an ancestor there are always two things that I generally have to re-iterate time-and-time again.

The first is that an ancestor’s name is never what one expects it to be. Time and people change their names, not necessarily by intention of the individual ancestor… But, it is always possible that somehow and somewhere what one was named when they were born, may be completely off the search mark when they pass away. And here we have a perfect case; in 1878 ggg-grandfather’s name was registered as Pierre Léandre Parisé. In 1942 he was registered for the World War II Draft as Leo Pariza. There are similarities but I had to go through 21 documents to prove the actuality of the two, and changes thereof, names.

Here is my Clooz listing summarizing the current 21 documents that I have on file for ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza.



The second key factor that one has to always take into account is that dates are never set in stone. No pun intended, because even the dates inscribed on a memorial or a gravestone may not be the actual or true date. My advice is always when searching for the vital records of an ancestor one should allow oneself a leeway of five years either way from a possible set date. Always take into consideration that there may be errors of registration, enumeration, and even the ancestor actually knowing the actual date.

And the search continues. There are two other key documents, relating to ggg-grandfather Leo that I need to track down; his marriage and his death.

I will keep looking.

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 797p – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1878 Baptism – GGG-Grandfather Pierre Léandre Parisé – Port Daniel, Bonaventure, Quebec, Canada

10 November 2012

Good Day,

Is genealogy a name game?

Leo Pariza = Leo Pierre Pariza = Leon Parizo = Leo Parisaya = Leon Parasaya = Leon Parisée = Pierre Léandre Parisé

And all are CK’s ggg-grandfather Leo.

Using the 1881 Canada Census, as displayed in Part 796p, I decided that I should, all-things-being-equal and using The Drouin Collection, locate a Baptism Registration for ggg-grandfather Leo.

No such luck. I have been able to locate the Baptism Registrations for all of his two brothers and three sisters. But I could not find one specifically for ggg-grandfather Leo. My immediate thought was that either he was never baptized at the local church, or at some point in time, his parents had him baptized at some other Roman Catholic Church.

I decided that it was now necessary to examine every possible Parisé Baptism Registration for Port Daniel. Using both the Library and Archives Canada and Ancestry.ca I conducted a search for the surname Parisé around the year 1878. I learned that there are about 75 immediate records, in French, that fit my search specifications. I elected to check out each and every one of the 75 records.

Guess what I found? I discovered an 1878, 22nd of September Baptism Registration for one “Pierre Léandre Parisé”. And his parents were Thimothé and Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé. These were the same parents of Malvina Parisé. This had to be ggg-grandfather Leo. And then it hit me… “Leo” could be a diminutive name for “Léandre”. In French, Leon has a closer phonetic sounding to Léandre than it does in English. In French – Leon is pronounced – “Laay-own” while in English it is pronounced – “Lee-on”. Léandre in French is pronounced – “Laay-awn-druh”, in English “Lee-an-drah” This has to be ggg-grandfather Leo, whose name at birth and baptism was “Pierre Léandre Parisé”. Bingo!

Here is the cut image of the 1878 Baptism Registration for ggg-grandfather Pierre Léandre Parisé. I have downloaded it from The Drouin Collection.





And my attempted transcription –

1855
A
1890

Port-Daniel
Cte Bonaventure
Qué

Paroisse
St. Georges

B:17
Pierre
Léandre
Parisé

Le vingt deux Septembre mil
huit cent soixante et dix-huit,
nous prêtre soussigné. avons
baptisé Pierre Léandre, né le huit
du même mois du légtime mariage
de Thimothé Parisé, pêcheur et culti-
vateur, et de Catherine Grenier,
de cette paroisse. Parrain
Paul Chapados; marraine:
Louise Pommier qui ont
déclaré ne savoir signer. Le père
absent. Lecture faite.

N. Lévesque

L'eux cent trente du même famille.


My translation –

1855
to
1890

Port-Daniel
Cte Bonaventure
Que

Parish
St. Georges

B: 17
Pierre
Léandre
Parisé

On the twenty-second of September one thousand eight hundred and seventy-eight, we the undersigned priest, baptized Pierre Léandre, born on the eighth of the same month, of the legitimate marriage of Thimothé Parisé, fisherman and farmer, and Catherine Grenier, of this parish. Godfather: Paul Chapados; Godmother: Louise Pommier, both who reported that they did not sign. The Father was absent. The reading was done.

N. Lévesque

The one hundred and thirty of them, of the same family.


And I am not sure what the additional line on the second page at the top means or has to do with the Baptism Registration.

I have created a Clooz Reporting – Birth Record for Pierre Léandre Parisé – B00003. Please contact me if you would like a copy.

And now we know that gg-grandfather Willard Joseph Pariza’s parents were ggg-grandparents Leo and Mary Pariza. GGG-Grandfather Leo’s parents were gggg-grandparents Thimothé and Catherine (née Grenier) Parisé. At this point in time, I have now constructed, beginning with and including CK, seven generations of the Parisé Family Line.

Next?

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 796p – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1881 Canada Census – Parisée Family – Port Daniel, Bonaventure, Quebec, Canada

Good Day,

And genealogy is never static, especially when it comes to the research of dates and names associated with our ancestors.

Per Wikipedia, Port-Daniels-Gascons is a municipality in the Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine region of the province of Quebec in Canada. It was formed on 17 January 2001, through the merger of the Municipality of Port-Daniel and the Parish Municipality of Sainte-Germaine-de-l’Anse-aux-Gascons. The population as of 2011 was 2,453.

The inserted image is the Harbour at Port-Daniel-Gascons taken by David Asch, 2010.

My search has now turned up an 1881 Canada Census for District 38 of Bonaventure County, Port Daniel 1st Division. Included in the 1881 Census is the Thimothé (aka Timothy) Parisée Family. Is this the Pariza, Parisaya, Parasaya, Parisé, Parizo Family that I am looking for?

The credible and corresponding facts included in the document are:

- The youngest daughter is Malvina Parisée. She is one-month old which corresponds to the Baptism Registration dated 6 March 1881. (See Part 797p.) (There is some documented data that Malvina, aka Vina, aka Alvina was born in Wisconsin. I believe that the notation is not necessarily correct and I will address this discussion in a later post.)

- Her parents are Thimothé (aka Timothy) and Catherine Parisé.

- Port Daniel, Bonaventure, Quebec, Canada corresponds with subsequent documents which relay that the Pariza, et al, Family originates from Canada.

- The 1881 Census enumerates that the “Origin” of the Parisée is “Française”, French.

- The youngest son’s name is Leon and his age is enumerated as “2”. This would mean that he was born in either 1878 or 1879. This may correspond to similar information provided and found for ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza.

Here is my highlighted copy of the 1881 Canada Census for the Parisée Family. It is downloaded via the Library and Archives Canada and Ancestry.ca.


And the following is my Clooz – Canada Schedule No. 1, 1881, Nominal Return of the Living – CCAQU000001.



And now to search for the origins of ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza? Or should I say Parisé?

Enjoy,

Jim
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Part 795p - Smith Groh Genealogy - 1881 Baptism - GGG-Grandaunt Malvina Parisé - Port Daniel, Quebec, Canada

09 November 2012

Good Day,

At times, in the field of genealogy it appears that all paths are blocked and all doors are closed. And then again at other times it seems that there is a slight glimmer through the crack in the doorway. Following my assumptions I have continued to pursue and investigate the surnames Pariza and Parisaya.

In this case the glimmer is The Drouin Collection. The Drouin Collection, of which there are 2,366 microfilms, includes over 25 million Vital Records (of all religious denominations) from Quebec, Ontario, Acadia, United States and other. A major part of the Collection is the Quebec Vital and Church Records, 1621-1967. The complete set is available for the paltry sum of only $75,000.

As luck would have it, a good portion of The Drouin Collection is available via Ancestry.com.

From The Drouin Collection – Québec Vital and Church Records, 1621-1967, I discovered the 1881 Baptism registration for one Malvina Parisé.

The following is a download of image 319 of 543 from The Drouin Collection.



My transcription -

1855
a
1890

Port Daniel
Cte Bonaventure
Qué

Paroisse
St. Georges

B-6
Malvina
Parisé

Le six Mars mil huit cent quatre-vingt
un, nous prêtre sousigné, avons
baptisé Malvina, née la vielle du
légitime marriage de Thimothé Parisé,
pêcheur et cultivateur, et de Catherine
Grenier, de cette paroisse. Parrain:
Napoléon Parisé; marraine Angé-
lique Roussi, qui ont declaré ne
savoir signer. Le père absent.
Lecture faite.

N. Lévesque


And my translation -

1855
to
1890

Port Daniel
County Bonaventure
Quebec

Parish
St. Georges

B-6
Malvina
Parisé

On March 6 one thousand eight hundred eighty-one, we the undersigned priest, have baptized Malvina, born before, of the legitimate marriage of Thimothé Parisé, fisherman and farmer, and Catherine Grenier, of this parish. Godfather: Napoleon Parisé; Godmother Angelique Roussi, who declared they could not sign. The father was absent. The Reading was done.

N. Lévesque

There are a number of facts in this Baptism Registration that parallel and also may correspond to the possibility that this is the record that I am searching for. The main point is that Malvina Parisé’s parents are Thimothé Parisé and Catherine Grenier. This compares highly to the information previously discovered that Vina Parisaya’s parents were Timothy Parisaya and Katherine Borrow. This is also provides a logical conclusion that Leo Pariza’s parents were presented as Timothy Parisaya and Catherine Grenier.

There is also the possible confirmation that Vina (née Parisaya) Wallnitz, who was Alvina Wallnitz is and was Malvina Parisé.

The next question is and does this proof of possible collateral lineage provide substantial proof for proof of CK’s blood line to ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza? Just wait. And if Malvina (née Parisé, aka Vina Parisaya, aka Alvina) Wallnitz was CK's ggg-grandaunt, it would be then possible that Thimothé (aka Timothy) and Catherine (née Grenier, aka Borrow) aka Parisaya, Parisé were CK's four-times great-grandparents.

Wait until I have deciphered that which I have found. And I do have a Clooz Report B00004 on file. Please let me know if you would like a copy.

Stay tuned, and enjoy,

Jim
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Part 794pw – Smith Groh Genealogy – 1920 US Census – Wallnitz Family – Marinette, Wisconsin – Collateral Research

08 November 2012

Good Day,

The search and research continues into the genealogy and origin of ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza.

As I presented in Part 793p Vina Parisaya, who married Fred Wallnitz, was registered in 1902 as the daughter of Timothy Parisaya and Catherine Borrow. Based on the uncited information and data provided on the Pariza Family Tree as found on Ancestry.com, see Part 792p, I understand that it was possible that Timothy and Katherine (née Grenier) Pariza could have been ggg-grandfather Leo’s parents based on the relationship to their son, ggg-granduncle John Clinton Pariza. I have already discovered that the surname Pariza was an alias for Parisaya. (See Part 782p.)

The two sets of names, Timothy Parisaya and Catherine Borrow, and, Timothy Pariza and Katherine Grenier, from both sources, definitely allow for a logical conclusion that these couples may be one and the same.

As a tangent, I am currently investigating a collateral line in order to realize and discover information regarding the actual blood line. From the Glossary of Genealogy.com a Collateral Line is a line of descent connecting persons who share a common ancestor, but are related through an aunt, uncle, cousin, nephew, etc. And from About.com a Collateral Ancestor is an ancestor not in the direct line of ascent, but of the same ancestral family.

All-things-being-equal, and based on a possible assumption, Vina (nee Parisaya) Wallnitz may have been CK's ggg-grandaunt. On this assumption, which may change based on new and more data and information that I may find over the course of my search and research, I may discover key information that may lead me further into the genealogy of ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza, aka Parisaya.

My next discovery was that of a 1920 US Census for Marinette City, Wisconsin which enumerates the Wallnitz Family. Included are Fred Wallnitz, his wife Alvina, and their son Ward. All else the same, Fred and Alvina Wallnitz are the same two people indicated in the 1902 Marriage Register - Fred Wallnitz and Vina Parisaya.

Here is the image of the page of the 1920 US Census highlighting the Wallnitz Family.


Here is my Clooz Report CUSWI000012 -


The search continues and now I have a number of new names to add to the list of "to look fors": Vina Parisaya, Vina Pariza, Alvina (nee Parisaya) Wallritz. Can I prove that Vina aka Alvina is ggg-grandfather Leo's relative, and maybe even sister?

Stay tuned, and enjoy,

Jim
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Part 793pw – Smith Groh Genealogy – Pariza Family Line – 1902 Marriage – Vina Parisaya and Fred Wallnitz – Menominee, Michigan

06 November 2012

Good Day,

And now the fun begins… that is if you are really into genealogy search and research. The inserted image to the right is from the 1912 Edition of the San Jose Mercury of California from Genealogy Bank News, December 2011.

At this point of time, in my collection of information and data regarding the life and times of ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza, I have chanced upon a number of different variations in the spelling and idiomatic constructions of his surname. I have found Pariza, Parizo, Parasaya, and Parisaya. They certainly are unlike my surname of Smith.

Taking a cue from most experts in genealogy research, I have been searching all possible iterations of the formation of the Pariza surname. One such possibility that is presented is based on the surname Parisaya. If you have been following my posts and research, I discussed this rendition of the surname in Part 783p. It is the 1900 US Census in Guinayangan, Philippine Islands which enumerates ggg-grandfather Leo Parisaya.

In Part 782p the two Index Cards from the Civil War Pension Index indicate that ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza was also known by the name Leo Parisaya. A number of other pieces of data and documents pretty much lead us to believe that sometime after 1905 the spelling of the surname was actually changed from Parisaya aka Parasaya to the current Pariza.

A general search of Family Search database for the name Parisaya provides 827,278 results. The first result is Leo Parisaya, as mentioned above, regarding the 1900 US Census.

The next five results all reference one Vina Parisaya. It is in reference to her 24 November 1902 marriage to Fred Wallnitz in Menominee, Michigan. Menominee, Michigan is just one mile north of Marinette, Wisconsin across the Menominee River. The "Residence of Each" are given as Marinette, Wis.. Marinette was the same location provided as the residence for ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza in the 1905 City of Marinette Directory.

The Marriage Register has actually two entries for the marriage of Vina Parisaya and Fred Wallnitz. The first entry, number 362, is dated 20 November 1902 but it is then completely crossed through. In one of the columns it is noted to “See No 372”. The second entry, number 372, is dated 28 November 1902. The main difference that I can see when comparing the two entries, apart from the date is that in the first entry Vina Parisaya’s parents are listed as “Unknown”. In the second entry, the one dated 28 November 1902 her parents are written as “Timothy Parisaya” and “Catherine”, and what looks like, at first take, “Borrow”. These names almost tie to the Family Tree chart that I discovered where it is recounted that “Timothy Pariza” and “Katherine Grenier” are the parents of "Leo Pierre Pariza". (See Part 792p.)

Here is the image, number 276, of the Marriage Register from the Family Search collection “Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1825”, Digital Folder Number 4042371 and microfilm FHL [2342522].

I have highlighted both entries.


Here are the four pages of my Clooz Marriage Record M00003.


I am following this as a possible lead that Vina Parisaya may be related to ggg-grandfather Leo Pariza aka Parisaya. Who knows what I may unearth?

Enjoy,

Jim
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